Blog Page 150

When considering the historical path of a river, it’s easy to imagine a torrential flood that causes a stream to overflow its banks, or a drought that brings a body of water to a trickle. The reality of a river’s history is vastly more complex, as the artery of water gradually changes directions over thousands of years, shifting its boundaries imperceptibly inch by inch.

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According to Wikipedia, The English language was first introduced to the Americas by British colonization, beginning in 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia. Similarly, the language spread to numerous other parts of the world as a result of British trade and colonization elsewhere and the spread of the former British Empire, which, by 1921, held sway over a population of 470–570 million people, approximately a quarter of the world’s population at that time.

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Italian photographer Bruno D’Amicis has won the 2015 Fritz Pölking prize with his photography story ‘Fennec, little ghost of the dunes’. The award, named in honour of wildlife photographer Fritz Pölking, who died in 2007, is run by the Society of German Nature Photographers. It is one of the categories in the GDT’s European wildlife photographer of the year awards. Here: An adult fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) stands on top of a sand dune in the Tunisian desert. It is the quintessential desert animal that covers almost all of northern Africa and the entire Sahara. Small dunes with sparse vegetation, which make the sand firmer enabling the fennec to dig burrows, are its typical habitat. (Photo by Bruno D’Amicis/Fritz Pölking Prize/GDT EWPY 2015)

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“You can look but you can’t touch.” That’s one of the first rules of museums, which house priceless works of art. But what about the community of blind and visually impaired who use their sense of touch to experience the world? The Unseen Art Project is an initiative to make art more accessible and inclusive by using 3D-printing technology to create replicas of masterpieces that can be touched ’till your heart is content.

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The soldiers would feed the polar bears with condensed milk tins. People would open such a tin with a tin-opener and then gave the can to the bear who licked all the milk from tin and then feed her little bears with it. Those blue and white tins of condensed milk were the winter dessert staple of every Soviet kid. The condensed milk (called in Russian: sgushchennoye moloko) had indeterminately long shelf life and there was always plenty of it. It was a common dessert in the army too. It isn’t surprised to see it given away to bears, because unlike some stuff that was rationed the condensed milk in USSR was available in unlimited amounts.

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25-year-old Nicola Congdon has been working on an unusual winter project for a great reason. Six months ago, the Cornwall-based woman decided to start knitting sweaters to keep her chickens warm amidst the winter season’s freezing temperatures. She has about 60 chickens in total and 30 of them are battery hens who were once crammed in cages to maximize their egg-laying capabilities. (That’s why they’re called battery hens—since their enclosures are lined up in rows that mimic the cells in a battery.) What most people don’t know is that these feathered creatures have trouble acclimating to normal weather conditions when they’re released from their cages.

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French photographer and director Romain Laurent (previously here and here) started making portrait-based GIFs as a way to produce work outside his commercial jobs, a spontaneous project that would encourage him to produce consistently for himself rather than clients. Each GIF is simple in its concept—a snap of the finger, a twist of the hand—yet is elegant in its composition of muted colors and subjects often centered squarely in the frame. Although GIFs often incorporate the whole subject, Laurent’s work highlights one or two specific movements, isolating gestures rather than animating the whole image.

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