Street Art

Annatomix, a self-taught painter from Birmingham UK, creates geometric, origami-inspired animals on everyday materials of all sizes. Bumblebees and rabbits take shape on small surfaces like discarded paper bags and wood scraps, while foxes and peregrine falcons scale the sides of buildings. Crafted in acrylic and spray paint, pastels, graphite, and ink, her animal renderings balance a fantastical element while also responding to the environment they are painted into.

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This past month, Sheffield-based artist Phlegm (previously) revealed his latest mural, a 5-story tall robot on Chapel Street in Melbourne, Australia. The mechanical monster hides a village, or maybe an entire world, beneath its metal scalp, which it reveals while simultaneously dangling a lantern over the homes below. To create the work, Phlegm worked with the building’s mechanics, repurposing a flashing carpark light near the structure’s third floor into a beating heart for his large-scale visitor. You can see more of the muralist’s black and white illustrative pieces from the last year in Manchester, Florida, Oslo, and Toronto, as well as a time-lapse video of his Melbourne-based robot mural, below.

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Bordalo II (previously) has created a series of bisected animals, colorful plastics forming one half of the creature while a combination of wood and metal created a muted mirror on the other side. In one piece the Portuguese artist created a turtle with legs that extend to the ground, appearing to crawl along the side of a a low wall in Moncton, Canada. Other works are more monumental, such as a rabbit that extends two stories in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal, and a raccoon that seems to dangle head first from a building in Pittsburgh.

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Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón or “Belin” (previously) has long practiced photorealistic murals. It was in 2016 however, that his work began to mutate with the adoption of a cubist style, elongating his subjects’ necks and segmenting their faces in ways that would make Picasso himself proud. Despite the distorted facial features, many of his new works feature recognizable subjects. Belin’s paintings honor some of his great inspirations, displaying the likenesses of painters such as Frida Kahlo, Keith Haring, and Dali, alongside famous subjects such as the Mona Lisa.

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Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone creates public murals that integrate black and white patterns with bright sweeping color spectrums. His tag “Pantone” is an evolution of his original name “Pant” chosen when he was just thirteen, a complete coincidence despite his color-rich works. His mash-up of grids and glitch-like 3D forms imbue the pieces with a throw-back digital futurism, an aesthetic that feels extremely grounded in 80s graphic design.

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Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

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