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Street Art

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón or “Belin” (previously) has long practiced photorealistic murals. It was in 2016 however, that his work began to mutate with the adoption of a cubist style, elongating his subjects’ necks and segmenting their faces in ways that would make Picasso himself proud. Despite the distorted facial features, many of his new works feature recognizable subjects. Belin’s paintings honor some of his great inspirations, displaying the likenesses of painters such as Frida Kahlo, Keith Haring, and Dali, alongside famous subjects such as the Mona Lisa.

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Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone creates public murals that integrate black and white patterns with bright sweeping color spectrums. His tag “Pantone” is an evolution of his original name “Pant” chosen when he was just thirteen, a complete coincidence despite his color-rich works. His mash-up of grids and glitch-like 3D forms imbue the pieces with a throw-back digital futurism, an aesthetic that feels extremely grounded in 80s graphic design.

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Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

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Playing with aspects of negative space and scale, Rotterdam-based artist Daan Botlek (previously) fills walls with his trademark anonymous figures, often interacting with their environment in strikingly inventive ways. The artist incorporates basic geometric elements, existing shadows, architectural elements, and found textures to depict silhouette figures that appear to fight against gravity or even themselves.

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It’s not often that you walk down the street and encounter an artwork that warms your heart or brings a smile to your face, but for Brazilian street artist and muralist Alex Senna, positive emotion seems to be his visual currency. His lanky black and white characters are often found in a variety of hopeful, loving, and positive scenes from a pair of lovers embracing to a family riding a bicycle. To intensify their emotional depth Senna often gives the flat characters broad shadows that stretch out larger-than-life across urban walls. You can check out more of Senna’s work on Instagram.

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