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sculpture

Self-taught artist Owen Mann creates ceramic blooms from dozens, and sometimes hundreds of petals, each hand-formed to mimic the appearance of peonies, dahlias, and spiraling succulents. Simply painted in cool shades of blues and greens, the porcelain flowers look as if they were freshly plucked from the garden. You can see more of Mann’s faux flora on his Instagram, and purchase the pieces on his Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

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Norwegian artist Lene Kilde seeks inspiration in the emotions of children, deftly capturing brief moments in their lives distilled into minimalistic wire mesh sculptures. The pieces focus almost entirely on the hands and feet of her subjects that dissolve into nothingness as they go about various activities. This is not to suggest anything is inherently missing, but rather to invite the viewer to complete the rest of each sculpture in their mind, perhaps substituting the missing fragments with their own memories or stories.

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Dutch multidisciplinary artist Vera van Wolferen (previously) produces miniature balsa wood sculptures, architectural objects that are either incorporated into animations or left motionless to tell their own stories. Her static works are often displayed beneath glass bell jars, leaving the audience to imagine that the tiny tree houses, cottages, and campers are neatly contained within their own universes. Van Wolferen also uses simple craft materials like cotton to enhance her sets, making it appear as if her sculpted homes are resting amongst the clouds.

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Since to 2011, Oregon-artist Darryl Cox (previously) has been making “Fusion Frames,” sculptural hybrids of picture frames and segments of tree roots. Each piece begins with a search to find a frame that closely matches the reclaimed roots he obtains from manzanita, juniper, and aspen trees, or even from grapevines. The pieces require extensive amounts of woodworking and painting to seamlessly fuse the two objects together, meaning Cox can only produce around 25 or so pieces each year.

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Japanese artist Ayumi Shibata uses traditional methods of Japanese paper cutting to create miniature cities within vessels of glass. Her chosen materials reference the delicate relationship humans have with our environment and natural forces of our world, while also relating to the Japanese translation of “paper.” In Japanese, the word for “paper” is “Kami,” which can also mean “god,” “divinity,” or “spirit.” Kami are omnipresent in the Shinto religion, and reside in the sky, ground, trees, and rocks.

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