Food

Based out of a Tokyo candy shop called Ameshin, candy artisan Shinri Tezuka (previously) crafts some of the most unusual lollipops you’re ever likely to eat from wiggling goldfish to statuesque lions or prickly hedgehogs. The translucent candy seems to have more in common with glassmaking than confectionery design, and perhaps it’s no surprise that the process of working with hot sugar even shares similar tools—a traditional Japanese craft called amezaiku. Tezuka recently shared a variety of new lollipop designs on his Instagram account and you can step inside the Ameshin candy shop in a video from DogaTV below.

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Although we first mentioned his work here only a month ago, food artist Gaku has continues to share numerous examples of his inventive approach to food carving called mukimono. Gaku works with little more than an x-acto knife to carve quickly before the fruit or vegetable starts to change color, executing motifs and patterns often found in Japanese art. You can see even more of his latest works on Instagram.

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Jakarta-based pastry chef Iven Kawi says she made her first honest attempt at baking in December of 2013 when she made a batch of Christmas cookies for her daughter’s school. As you can see, things have progressed quite a bit. Kawi now runs a bakery shop out of her home in Lippo Karawaci called Iven Oven where she creates elaborately decorated baked goods. Among her specialties are cakes adorned with terrarium environments where buttercream frosting is sculpted into an abundance of cacti and flower petals atop beds of crumbly sand or dirt. You can follow more of her work on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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As part of a fantastic collaborative project between photographer Kelsey McClellan and prop/set stylist Michelle Maguire, the duo conceived of wardrobes that would perfectly match various foods. Titled Wardrobe Snacks, the series draws inspiration from the color, texture, or design of simple foods like a green ice cream cone, a plain yellow donut, or even an oyster and finds the uncannily matched outfit. You can see the full series here. (via artnau, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Six months in the making, these enormous chocolate-covered rock candy geodes are the creation of culinary students Alex Yeatts and Abby Lee Wilcox, the results of a final project for the Culinary Institute of America in New York. Details are scarce on how the duo went about creating the giant sugar rocks, some of which have the distinct hue of purple amethyst. The calorie count is also illusive, but we can only imagine it equates to the years these things take to form in real life. (via Sploid)

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