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Thanks to the Library of Congress, you can browse and download high-resolution copies of more than 2,500 Japanese woodblock prints and drawings from the library’s online collection. The prints, most of which are dated before the 20th-century, were amassed from a large group of collectors, including notable donors such as President William Howard Taft and Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.

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The female characters inhabiting the world of London-based illustrator Miles Johnston appear to be undergoing near perpetual transformation, their faces or bodies split in half, or their entire form morphing into globby organic forms. Over the past few years he’s examined four specific transformations organized into series titled Deform, Divide, Attract, and Recur. Johnston will have work on view at the upcoming Small Works exhibition at beinArt Gallery and you can also follow him on Instagram. (via Booooooom, Artnau)

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Artist and SAIC professor Pablo Garcia (previously) has added an update to his previous take on the two century old Camera Lucida, an optical device that allows you to trace images and scenes directly from life. The new version, NeoLucida XL, is similar to its predecessor, however with a much larger viewfinder. The prism inside the updated analog device remains the same size, while the larger mirror and glass make it much easier to draw the projected “ghost image.” You can read more about the device on its Kickstarter page.

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French artist Steeven Salvat has long been fascinated by the clarity and exactitude found in old biological studies. His portfolio is brimming with such renderings, usually with a modern twist such as this stunning series of decorative drawings on skateboard decks. For this new series titled Mechanical / Biological [Crustacean Study] , Salvat imagined intricate clockwork mechanisms that might animate the rigid exteriors of crabs, lobsters, and crayfish. The 10-piece collection was drawn entirely with a 0.13mm Rotring technical drawing pen, the process of which he captured in a video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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As part of his ongoing Globes series, London-based architect Amer TendToTravel sketches the familiar landmarks and textural street patterns of familiar cities onto tiny moon-sized spheres. Seen here are locales like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne whose skyscrapers reach out like tiny spikes atop the Death Star. You can see more of his completed globes and works-in-progress on his website and on Instagram. If you liked this, also check out the work of Ben Sak. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Barcelona-based illustrator Vorja Sánchez depicts comically surreal storybook creatures that look like a cross between mutant dinosaurs and shadowy demons—but also captures the very lifelike spirit of birds and other animals. Working with a variety of mediums from pen and link to watercolor or spray paint, each piece is inspired by events in his daily life, an observation he makes while walking through the forest or drawing from a recent stint living in Nicaragua where he organized painting classes for children and adults. Sánchez has just begun working as a full-time artist in the last few months and is currently wrapping up work on an illustrated book. You can follow more of his artwork on Facebook and Instagram.

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Unlike the human body which is composed of only 18% carbon, Agelio Batle‘s latest project is produced from 100% of the semimetal material. The work, titled Ash Dancer, is a life-size skeleton that acts like a very large pencil. When placed on a custom made high-frequency vibrating table, the bones of the skeleton rub marks onto the surface, slowly creating an outline of its own form. The more the work rubs against the table, the more of itself is left behind, slowly transforming the graphite from sculpture to abstract drawings which Batle refers to as Ash Dances.

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