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French artist Steeven Salvat has long been fascinated by the clarity and exactitude found in old biological studies. His portfolio is brimming with such renderings, usually with a modern twist such as this stunning series of decorative drawings on skateboard decks. For this new series titled Mechanical / Biological [Crustacean Study] , Salvat imagined intricate clockwork mechanisms that might animate the rigid exteriors of crabs, lobsters, and crayfish. The 10-piece collection was drawn entirely with a 0.13mm Rotring technical drawing pen, the process of which he captured in a video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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As part of his ongoing Globes series, London-based architect Amer TendToTravel sketches the familiar landmarks and textural street patterns of familiar cities onto tiny moon-sized spheres. Seen here are locales like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne whose skyscrapers reach out like tiny spikes atop the Death Star. You can see more of his completed globes and works-in-progress on his website and on Instagram. If you liked this, also check out the work of Ben Sak. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Barcelona-based illustrator Vorja Sánchez depicts comically surreal storybook creatures that look like a cross between mutant dinosaurs and shadowy demons—but also captures the very lifelike spirit of birds and other animals. Working with a variety of mediums from pen and link to watercolor or spray paint, each piece is inspired by events in his daily life, an observation he makes while walking through the forest or drawing from a recent stint living in Nicaragua where he organized painting classes for children and adults. Sánchez has just begun working as a full-time artist in the last few months and is currently wrapping up work on an illustrated book. You can follow more of his artwork on Facebook and Instagram.

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Unlike the human body which is composed of only 18% carbon, Agelio Batle‘s latest project is produced from 100% of the semimetal material. The work, titled Ash Dancer, is a life-size skeleton that acts like a very large pencil. When placed on a custom made high-frequency vibrating table, the bones of the skeleton rub marks onto the surface, slowly creating an outline of its own form. The more the work rubs against the table, the more of itself is left behind, slowly transforming the graphite from sculpture to abstract drawings which Batle refers to as Ash Dances.

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Artist Dina Brodsky has many focuses to her practice, painting in miniature on canvas and paper, and recently turning to her family, friends, and Instagram community to submit trees for her to reproduce in a drawn project titled “The Secret Life of Trees.” Throughout both of these processes she remains extremely attentive to her sketchbook, filling its pages with detailed drawings of architecture, wildlife, and scattered portraits of strangers that accompany her looped handwriting. The drawings are often finished with touches of watercolor, gouache, gold leaf, and found objects from her travels, like in one where she pastes a rupee note from India.

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Marco Mazzoni (previously here and here) creates works that at first lead the viewer astray, appearing as bouquets or nests until one notices fins protruding from the flora that sprawls across his Moleskine sketchbooks. Some works concentrate on small groups of animals while others serve as finely drawn “I Spy” collages, as he incorporates camouflaged toads and birds into lush, textured gardens.

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Chinese artist Wenyi wanders the streets of his home in Dali, Yunnan Province, China, gathering bits of discarded cardboard to use as his canvas. Wenyi then takes the bits of trash he finds and draws the surroundings on each object. The small pieces range from quick black and white sketches to colorful drawings of entire homes, each a snapshot of his hometown. After sketching the scenery Wenyi places his completed works back into their original locations, imbuing the everyday refuse with art. “I want people to see art in our everyday life,” said Wenyi to Bored Panda, “even if it’s on wasted paper.” (via Booooooom, Bored Panda)

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Tasarım Takarım (I Wear Design) is a Turkish jewelry company that converts children’s illustrations into finely crafted silver and gold jewelry. The project was first started two years ago by artists Yasemin Erdin Tavukçu and Özgür Karavit, who saw the opportunity to turn a simple doodle into timeless decorative object, not unlike bronzing a child’s baby shoes or capturing their handprints in clay. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and often requires special tools or means of production to faithfully replicate the intricacies of a child’s scribbles. You can follow their work on Instagram and Etsy. (via HuffPo)

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