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Design

As part of the 2012 RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in London, landscape and design consultancy The Edible Bus Stop conceived of a green space that incorporated gardens, artwork, and the conversion of a street into public space. The temporary exhibition titled Riot of Color was conceived as “a post apocalyptic interpretation of the after effects of the 2011 London riots.” One of the more novel aspects was this fun park bench designed as yellow street lines that rise from pavement to wrap around a tree. You can see more views on their website.

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Using digital files pulled from NASA’s archives, French design studio Harow designed a table that replicates the real topology of the moon’s surface. The Apollo 11 Table features a sculpted fiberglass slab in the form of a lunar crater. Covering this thick segment is a layer of resin, which allows one to fully view its dips and crevices while providing coverage to the uneven terrain. The brass and aluminum alloy feet also pay homage to the many Apollo missions, parts that put a modern spin on the Lunar Excursion Module‘s original landing pads.

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After four years of construction, Denmark’s colorful LEGO House has finally been unveiled to the public in the company’s native land of Billund. The building, designed by the Copenhagen and New York-based design firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is composed of 21 large, white cubes which each contain a colorfully painted roof. This “stack” is topped by an oversized LEGO brick, an oblong keystone which contains eight skylights that peer into the building below.

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New Delhi-based architecture and design company Ant Studio recently created a completely low-energy cooling system that relies on clay tubes and water as a cheap alternative to traditional air conditioners. The spherical system reminiscent of a beehive was built as a part of a larger beautification project for a DEKI Electronics factory. The simple, low-tech solution adds an aesthetic twist to the typical metal appliance, and requires little upkeep to ensure its surroundings stay cool.

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Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

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