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Design

The Jollylook is a new camera concept that merges the retro form-factor of a fold out camera utilizing polaroid film, and it’s fabricated primarily from recycled cardboard. Despite the bare-bones construction the Jollylook has an adjustable aperture, lens settings for different shooting modes (landscape, portrait, group, or macro), and a crank for extracting the polaroid once the image is taken. All you have to do is load it up with commonly available Fujifilm “instax mini” instant film cartridges. The project is currently funding on Kickstarter and reached their goal in just a few hours. (via PetaPixel)

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Retired graphic designer Don Moyer has found a delightful second career illustrating and designing a line of charmingly calamitous products to help you keep your woes in perspective. The Calamityware Mug Set, newly available in The Colossal Shop, features four identical mugs glazed with Don’s illustrations. Riffing on traditional Blue Willow porcelain patterns, the Calamityware mugs slyly integrate some unlikely and unwelcome visitors. Watch out for UFOs, a zombie poodle, aggressive pterodactyls, and, perhaps most fearful of all, the Unpleasant Blob Creature. Each porcelain mug holds 12 ounces and is made at the award-winning Kristoff Porcelain workshop in Poland. The set includes four mugs because as we all know, misery loves company.

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Papercraft duo Zim & Zou (previously) are back at it with one of their most grandiose installations yet for Hermès in Dubai. Each piece is a miniature paper village populated with tiny characters, one centered around towers of fungi, the other based around blooming lotus flowers. Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, the names behind Zim & Zou, specialize in designing and building installations out of tangible materials for advertising, product display, and as part of personal artistic pursuits. You can follow more of their recent work on Instagram and Behance.

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Gazing up, the first thing you notice when viewing the 33-foot tall cabin, The 7th Room, is its base, an aluminum covering featuring black and white images of the pine trees that surround the structure. Used as camouflage, this exterior panel immerses the treetop cabin into its environment, blurring the boundaries between the building and forest. Designed by architecture firm Snøhetta, the structure is also intended to bring visitors closer to nature, built with a suspended net at its center, and several floor-to-ceiling windows that allow for multiple viewpoints of the Aurora Borealis overheard.

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