Art

Matthias Jung (previously) creates worlds of surreal architecture that inhabit vast photographed landscapes. The works merge together different elements of photography to create unusual compositions, structures you might vividly remember from a dream. By placing the composite structures in commonplace landscapes the German-based graphic designer preserves their believability, allowing us to momentarily trick our brains into thinking these places actually exist in environments we have not yet explored.

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Meticulously folding canvas and layering color, the art duo Stallman (Jason Hallman and Stephen Stum) turn a traditional painting surface on its head, using the structure of the canvas to give their works vibrant depth. The two artists are deeply inspired by gradients found in the natural world, their color selection and positioning appearing almost topographic.

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Visual artist Noell Osvald (previously) creates startlingly bold works through simple gestures all performed in black and white. The self-portraits rarely show the 25-year-old artist’s face, instead expressing emotion through the way she tilts her head or slightly crooks her neck. Emphasizing line, her works incorporate a strict horizon or eliminate it altogether, segmenting the image from left to right. In one particularly powerful image the back of her head faces the camera and her hair is completely down. Her hair is gently separated over her shoulders and her part continues upward from the nape of her neck and meets with the corner of the wall above. She stands directly in the center of this division, making it seem as if her environment is splitting her in two.

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Based in a quiet undisclosed studio a short train ride outside of downtown Berlin, artist Peter Aurisch creates some of the most original tattoos in the city—and in a place with an estimated 2,000 tattoo artists, that’s saying something. To keep his ideas fresh and original, Aurisch may only begin planning a new piece when the client first arrives. He tends to work freehand without sketches or source imagery, and instead draws inspiration from stories and details provided by his customers.

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Lithuanian artist Agne Gintalaite has always been attracted to the “garage towns” of her native Lithuania—large areas filled with storage units for cars that were terribly inconvenient and often bus rides away from the owners’ homes. In her series Beauty Remains, Gintalaite explores the multitude of garage doors she has discovered on her explorations, the brightly colored wooden and metal doors that look as if time has tried to claw them to pieces, yet their vibrancy withstands each passing year.

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