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Art

French muralist Julien Malland (aka Seth) has been extremely prolific over the last year, traveling to far flung locations around the world including China, Tahiti, New Zealand, Italy, Canada, and even the Reunion Islands in just the last few months alone. Seth paints large-scale human figures—mostly children—that appear faceless, cut off by the edges of buildings or turned completely away from the viewer, as if looking out into the world or witnessing something we cannot see. From his artist statement:

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Street artist Blu was recently spotted in Naples, Italy putting the finishing touches on this giant green prisoner tearing free from his uniform. The unannounced artwork is supposedly an allusion to the building it’s painted on, a former prison site that is being converted into an open community space. As usual, Blu painted the piece entirely by hand, using ropes to dangle from the side of the building without scaffolding or cherry pickers. See more views on StreetArtNews.

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Brooklyn-based painter Iris Scott (previously) eschews brushes and palette knives in favor of using the most traditional art tools of all time: her fingers. Her color-saturated canvases of thick oil paint capture shaking wet dogs, dreamy urban cityscapes, and serene outdoor scenes. “There’s nothing between me and the paint, I feel all the tiny nuances,” says Scott. “I can manipulate thick paint with my fingers in ways brushes never could.” The physicality of using her digits brings a unique sense of motion to each piece and when coupled with nearly 100 colors for a single artwork, it’s no surprise to discover how entrancing each canvas becomes.

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Inspired by animalistic forms both living and extinct, artist Mylinh Nguyen welds alien creatures from brass, bronze, and silver. Using a variety of machining techniques each creature takes form over several weeks, originating first as haphazard sketches in a notebook before evolving into permanent metal forms. Nguyen is a master of articulating even the most minute skeletal details of imaginary beings with metal, such as her seed-pod-meets-jellyfish series Meduses or her 2012 series of aquatic life, Sous-Marins. Nguyen currently has several pieces on view at the Les 3 CHA centre d’art in Châteaugiron, France. (via Lustik)

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