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Art

We are often inundated with images of famous artworks, pieces even the most disconnected art viewer can name on the spot. These portraits however make up a very small percentage of the work in museums worldwide, the majority of faces either nameless or not burned into memory—men, women, and children immortalized by brushstroke but forgotten by time. These anonymous faces are the ones that French artist Julien de Casabianca (previously) is most drawn to, and has been “liberating” for the last few years by placing recreations of the unknown on urban street corners and abandoned buildings as a part of his Outings Project.

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Artist Darryl Cox fuses ornate vintage picture frames with tree branches found in the forests of central Oregon. The branches serve as a simple reminder of the materials used to build picture frames, but also create an unusual form factor where clean lines and ornate moulding patterns seem to naturally traverse the bark of each tree limb. Each piece involves many hours of woodworking, sculpting, and painting.

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Artist Hillary Fayle (previously) continues her exploration of embroidered plantlife using elegent stitching to create amalgams of leaves and seeds. Ginkgo leaves and maple tree seeds are sutured into tight geometric forms, while other pieces play with negative space as Fayle deftly cuts patterns and shapes directly into them. The plants are coated in a non-toxic preservative to both protect the artwork and ensure the brittle materials are more resistant to tearing. Seen here is a collection of Fayle’s work from the last year or so, but you can explore more on her blog and on Instagram.

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Inspired by the relics of his parents’ past as Czech publishers and book smugglers, Martin Tomsky (previously) produces laser-cut illustrations that introduce depth with several layers of plywood in varying tones. Originally immersed in drawing detailed scenes on paper, Tomsky transferred his skills to the 3D, creating stories that seem tangled in lore and feature the outlines of animal skeletons, dense forestry, and mythical beasts.

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Artist Thomas Medicus (previously) just unveiled a new anamorphic sculpture titled Emergence Lab that contains six handpainted images inside a large translucent cube. The six fragmented paintings are spread across 216 laser-cut acrylic glass strips that are designed to perfectly align when viewed directly from each side. Each figure is cleverly contained within the same surface as its counterpart on the opposite side, and the object is filled with silicone oil giving it the look and feel of solid glass. Watch the video to see how it works, and Medicus shares some behind the scenes photos of his design process. You can also follow him on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Artist Andy Thomas recently shared a montage of new sound art pieces titled Synthetic Nature that shows his beautifully bizarre digital sculptures as they move in response to audio. The virtual organisms are constructed using a host of software (3ds Max, Realflow, Quantum force, Fume fx, Krakatoa, Frost, etc.), with the end result being ‘programs’ that visually react to an array of audio inputs. Different frequencies or tones cause the piece to behave in varying ways based on Thomas’ own manipulated audio of flora and fauna recorded around Australia. You can see more of his experiments on Vimeo, and he also creates wild digital images available as prints on RedBubble.

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