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Art

No, we’re not staring down the eyes of our new insect overlords, but you could certainly be forgiven for thinking so. Instead this is the latest artwork from South Korea-based artist duo Kimchi and Chips (Mimi Son and Elliot Woods) — a piece so thoroughly layered with technology it almost defies description despite being undeniably intriguing to witness. Titled Light Barrier Third Edition, the installation is the third in an ongoing series of works that utilize a vast array of projectors, mirrors, and speakers to present volumetric light forms which materialize in a foggy haze just above the work. From their artist statement:

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A girl is seen softly touching the nose of a giant, white horse frozen in mid-air within the Argentinian Pavilion of this year’s Venice Biennale, a large sculptural work by artist Claudia FontesThe Horse Problem, and the Argentinian Pavilion, are located within the biennale’s Arsenal building, the largest pre-industrial production center of the world. Made long ago from wood, bricks, and iron, the building is one that could have only been built by horse-power, the work highlighting the hidden influences the animal had on the city.

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Artist Lorenzo Quinn (previously) just finished the installation of a monumental sculpture for the 2017 Venice Biennale. Titled Support, the piece depicts a pair of gigantic hands rising from the water to support the sides of the Ca’ Sagredo Hotel, a visual statement of the impact of climate change and rising sea levels on the historic city. Quinn is known for his work with the human body—specifically hands—that he incorporates into everything from large-scale sculptures down to jewelry designs. Quinn is represented by Halcyon Gallery, and you can see more installation photos and videos of Support on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Inspired by his daily experience of life in the Pacific Midwest, artist and designer Greg Klassen (previously) fabricates one-of-a-kind tables featuring blue glass rivers, lakes, and waterfalls. The topographical studies mimic bodies of water seen from an aerial view, but the twisting blue pathways are often defined by the wood pieces he selects. While the majority of Klassen’s work serves as functional art, he’s also begun to create more isolated wood and glass sculptures mounted on walls.

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Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone creates public murals that integrate black and white patterns with bright sweeping color spectrums. His tag “Pantone” is an evolution of his original name “Pant” chosen when he was just thirteen, a complete coincidence despite his color-rich works. His mash-up of grids and glitch-like 3D forms imbue the pieces with a throw-back digital futurism, an aesthetic that feels extremely grounded in 80s graphic design.

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Stretched like a digital glitch, these distorted chairs by Dutch artist Sebastian Brajkovic appear more like a product of Photoshop than a physical object. The Paris-based sculptor has been turning heads (and twisting necks) at art museums and galleries for over a decade with his ongoing Lathe series that imparts elements of the digital world onto classical furniture designs. Brajkovic extrudes the seats, backs, and even the designs printed on them to form wild new chairs with varying degrees of functionality.

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