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Animals

Working with a mixture of cold porcelain and polymer atop a metal wire armature, artist Ellen Jewett (previously) creates wildly intricate sculptures of animals covered in a tangle of surreal embellishments. The artist describes her works as “anthrozoology meets psychoanalysis,” where tiny clues left in the feathers, fur, and tentacles of each piece lead to a greater story of its meaning. From her artist statement:

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Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman (who previously produced this oversized bunny in Taiwan) has unveiled his newest large-scale animal design, this time with the function of a playscape for Vanke Group's One City development in the centre of Yantian, Shenzhen. The playground is designed within the eight legs and head of an octopus, a piece that is named after the mythological sea creature Kracken despite its friendly appearance.

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Indonesia-based watercolor artist Elicia Edijanto (previously here and here) depicts loving relationships between wildlife and children set against atmospheric backdrops painted in black watercolor. “My subject are often children and animal because they are honest, sincere, unprejudiced and unpretentious,” shares Edijanto. “They give me so much inspiration for [a] particular mood or atmosphere, such as tranquility, solemnity, and also wilderness and freedom, which I put on my paintings.” Seen here are a number of recent paintings from the last year or so, some of which are available as prints and originals via her website. You can follow her works in progress on Instagram.

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Minneapolis-based artist Alex Kuno imagines a world of twisted organic beings that borrow elements of plant life, anatomy, and the natural world. The artist admits that his illustrations are likely to creep some people out, but purposefully includes ideas that highlight life and growth, creating a dichotomy of revulsion and delight as the viewer carefully untangles each artwork. The mixed-media drawings are made primarily using ink, watercolor, graphite and chalk. You can see more of Kuno’s artwork on Instagram and limited edition prints are available in his shop. (via Booooooom)

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We continue to be enthralled by the work of Chloe Giordano (previously here and here) who produces everything from tiny coin-sized depictions of woodland creatures to entire book covers typography and all. The Oxford-based illustrator is entirely self-taught, learning her craft “through a lot of trying things out and messing them up.” Each piece is deeply connected to her pencil drawings, as she works out many of the details on paper before turning to thread. Giordano frequently fields questions on her Tumblr and you can follow more of her progress on Instagram.

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic (previously) paints nature in a way that is both direct and obscure, producing animals with the precision of a tightly rendered nature illustration, while simultaneously escaping the form’s limitations. Her subject matter typically revolves around forest creatures and their environment, while occasionally including creatures and plants such as amoeba-like jellyfish, creepy insects, and exotic flowers. These diverse sects of the natural world combine in ways that are not natural at all—a deer’s soft hair appearing as moss in one work while a skunk gallantly balances on top of a hovering botanical bouquet in another.

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