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Animals

We continue to be enthralled by the work of Chloe Giordano (previously here and here) who produces everything from tiny coin-sized depictions of woodland creatures to entire book covers typography and all. The Oxford-based illustrator is entirely self-taught, learning her craft “through a lot of trying things out and messing them up.” Each piece is deeply connected to her pencil drawings, as she works out many of the details on paper before turning to thread. Giordano frequently fields questions on her Tumblr and you can follow more of her progress on Instagram.

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic (previously) paints nature in a way that is both direct and obscure, producing animals with the precision of a tightly rendered nature illustration, while simultaneously escaping the form’s limitations. Her subject matter typically revolves around forest creatures and their environment, while occasionally including creatures and plants such as amoeba-like jellyfish, creepy insects, and exotic flowers. These diverse sects of the natural world combine in ways that are not natural at all—a deer’s soft hair appearing as moss in one work while a skunk gallantly balances on top of a hovering botanical bouquet in another.

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Freelance illustrator and 3D artist Mat Szulik (previously) creates incredibly realistic models, digitally rendering figures that appear as if they were formed from materials such as wood, and most recently wire. His latest project, titled The Wires v2, presents the outlines of forest creatures, horses, and beetles, each placed in stark, white environments or amongst trees built in the same style as the wire animals. The renderings are almost entirely silver wire, yet many also contain a gold core to add a further layer of dimensionality. You can see works from Szulik’s first wire series, The Wires v1, as well as other 3D projects on his Behance.

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At the age of only 27, self-taught candy sculptor Shinri Tezuka (previously) may be one of the youngest practitioners of amezaiku, the dwindling art of candy crafting. Even though the craft dates back hundreds of years, there are only two known candy makers in all of Tokyo who roll, sculpt, and paint lollipops in this manner. Great Big Story recently stopped by Tezuka’s workshop for a quick video interview you can see below.

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Japanese paper artist Chie Hitotsuyama deftly creates textured sculptures of animals using a technique involving rolled strips of wet newspaper. The compact application of each newspaper segment proves to be an elegant method of forming the wild fur of snow monkeys or the density of scales found on the back of an iguana. For Hitotsuyama, these details are critical as she seeks to create the most lifelike sculptures possible.

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Artist Bunnie Reiss enjoys transforming the old into new, and has spent her life as a collector of weathered objects with rich stories. Reiss’s ongoing project turns her collection of old leather gloves into bright works of art, utilizing symmetry and cosmic imagery to connect both the past and present. The gloves are not obvious references to animal faces, but subtle gestures that reference eyes, ears, and noses within their design.

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